General Biology 101
General Biology 102
Developmental Biology 406
Animals as Organisms 209

 

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GENERAL BIOLOGY 101-102

General Biology 101 and 102 are courses which may be taken to satisfy the 8 hours of a laboratory science required by the General Studies Program at Shepherd. It is important to note that one may not combine one semester of General Biology with any other science class in order to meet this requirement. It is also generally true that one must take both semesters of General Biology at Shepherd College. This two-semester survey of the principles and concepts of biological science is designed primarily for the non-science major. A student may begin this two-semester sequence with either 101 or 102. Each 4 hour semester course consists of both a lecture and laboratory section component and it is essential that each student be enrolled in a lecture and a lab section taught by the same instructor.

The major topics covered in 101 are those of ecology or environmental biology together with principle concepts relating to the anatomy and physiology of multicellular animal and plant organisms with emphasis upon circulation, gas exchange, nutrition, homeostasis, regulation and control systems. The principle topics of 102 are reproduction, genetics, evolution and cellular structure and function.

The current text for both semesters is BIOLOGY - Life on Earth - 7th Edition by Audesirk and Audesirk. This is a new text and is a useful reference that all students should have available to them. The bookstore has new copies of the text. The Study Guide for this text is completely optional. There are also laboratory manuals for each semester’s course which are available in the bookstore. At the beginning of the lab manual is a schedule of topics and reading assignments for the semester.

Your grade in the course will be determined by your performance on major exams and pop quizzes. At roughly 4-week intervals, you will write a 100 point, mostly objective examination. The dates of these four, major exams will be announced well in advance, usually before the end of the first week of the semester. Each of these 4 exams will cover only the course material taken up in the 3-4 weeks prior to that exam. The last of these 4, 100 point exams will be scheduled during final examination week at the time set aside for a “final” for classes meeting at our scheduled time. Along with this exam, you will also write a 50 point departmental, comprehensive final exam, which will consist of multiple-choice questions covering the entire semester’s work. Thus there will be 450 points possible on these major exams.

In addition, your course grade will be influenced by at least seven(7), 20 points each, pop-quizzes given during the semester. Such quizzes may be given at any time during either a lecture or a lab period, and will be unannounced. Only the highest 5 quiz grades will be considered in calculating your overall grade in the course, i.e. and additional 100 points possible for a grand total of 550 points. At the end of the semester, the total points scored on the 4, 100 point exams, the 50 point departmental final and the 5 highest, 20 point quizzes will be calculated for each student and a letter grade assigned according to the following scale:

Per cent of Total

Total Points

Grade

90% - 100%

495 - 550

A

80% - 89%

440-494

B

70% - 79%

385-439

C

60% - 69%

330-384

D

below 60%

0 - 329

F

All students are expected to attend each and every lecture and laboratory period, to pay attention, to participate and to take comprehensive notes. There is no substitute for your attendance and participation in lecture and lab. There is really no way to “make-up” for missing this experience. I will not know if it was “alright” for a student to miss a class until the next exam or quiz is taken which covers the material that was missed. If a student misses a class or lab for any reason, the only thing that can be done is to seek notes from other students in the class, usually a very poor substitute.

I WILL NOT REQUIRE ANY STUDENT IN MY CLASS TO MISS ANY OF THEIR OTHER CLASSES AND I EXPECT THAT NO STUDENT WILL BE REQUIRED TO MISS THIS CLASS BY ANY OTHER COURSE INSTRUCTOR, ESPECIALLY ON A SCHEDULED EXAM DATE. ALTERNATIVELY, YOU MAY ASK ANY OTHER INSTRUCTOR TO EXCUSE YOU FROM ANY ACTIVITY WHICH CONFLICTS WITH THE SCHEDULED CLASS MEETINGS OF THIS COURSE.

Obviously, there may be rare occasions when a class is missed. I will answer specific questions about the missed work. I will provide any handout material that was given out to the class. I will try to arrange for a student to sit-in with another lab section, if possible. If an exam is missed for a valid, documented emergency relating to serious health or safety reasons, a make-up exam will be provided, likely in the form of an essay exam. I would expect to be notified in a timely and appropriate fashion about any such emergency. Pop quizzes that are missed may not be made up for any reason. Remember, only the five highest quiz grades will count toward your final grade. NOTE: During the early part of the Spring semester, inclement weather (snow and/or ice) may create special concerns. Review the College “snow” policy. Expect me to be on campus, prepared for class...Always. Commuter students are expected to use common sense with regard to travel during periods of difficult weather. Commuter students may expect a “liberal” interpretation of the “snow” policy with regard to making up major exams and lab work.

Cheating will not be tolerated. Each student is expected to do his/her own work without giving or receiving assistance with regard to other students or unauthorized references during an exam or quiz. A grade of zero will be assigned to any quiz or exam that involves cheating.

For safety and other reasons eating and drinking are forbidden in lab. The use of any tobacco products is strictly forbidden at any time in any campus academic building. Turn off all cell phones or pagers during lecture and lab sessions.

Shortly after the beginning of the semester, my office hours will be posted next to my office door, Rm. 214 in the BYRD Science Center addition. Remember, we are scheduled to meet with each other formally several times during each week of the semester, so there should be ample opportunity for you to arrange an appointment to see me if regular office hours are inconvenient for you. There are times that I may be engaged in lab set-up or research activities near my office during office hours, so look around closely if I am not actually sitting at my desk.

My e-mail address is: jlandolt@shepherd.edu.

My campus phone number with voice mail is 876-5357.

 

 

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