WRITTEN ENGLISH 1: ENGLISH 101

Shepherd University

 

INSTRUCTOR: Professor Judy Spence

 

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS:

  • Austin, Michael.  Reading the World: Ideas that Matter.  New York: W. W. Norton, 2007.
  • Hacker, Diana.  A Writer’s Reference.  Sixth Edition.  New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2007.
  • Satrapi, Marjane.  Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood.  New York: Pantheon, 2003.
  • A student computer account (set up email forwarding, if necessary)
  • A Rambler card (with money on the account) for printing papers in the computer lab during class. 
  • A folder

 

COURSE PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES:

The goals for written English I are to develop students’ critical reading, thinking and writing skills.  Students will be expected to read, understand, analyze and relate selections from the Austin text to their experiences and/or other ways of knowing.   Emphasis is placed on learning to develop clear, logical, well-structured expository essays, free from serious grammatical and mechanical errors.   In order to accomplish this task, students will learn writing as a process.  

 

The writing process includes

  • making connections among readings;
  • synthesizing information; 
  • learning to formulate a thesis (an arguable assertion supported by examples and analysis);
  • proofreading;
  • editing;
  • revising drafts.

 

In addition, students will be introduced to both western and non-western writers of both genders and writing from a variety of cultural and ethnic contexts.

 

ESSENTIAL SKILLS AND OUTCOMES TO BE ACQUIRED THROUGH THE COURSE INCLUDE:

  1. an ability to render close textual analysis;
  2. an ability to synthesize information from multiple texts;
  3. an ability to render clear, cogent ideas;
  4. an ability to structure well-developed essays with thesis, textual support, and analysis;
  5. an ability to correctly employ standard written English usage;
  6. an understanding of ethnic/cultural diversity;
  7. an ability to utilize basic technology to improve writing and thinking skills.

 

POLICIES:

 

Class participation is a must.

You will be given a class participation grade for each class period.  There is a difference between simply filling a seat and actively participating in the class, and your grade will reflect this difference.  In order to be eligible for a daily class participation grade, you must come to class with necessary materials.

 

Attendance is not optional.

You will be allowed four absences for any reason.  After four absences, you will be ineligible to earn class participation points.  You are encouraged to use these excused absences with care.

Any in-class work missed due to an absence (including in-class essays) may not be made up unless arrangements have been made with the instructor at least one day in advance.  You must get class notes from fellow students.

 

An out of class assignment turned in late will be marked down one letter grade for each day it is overdue.  If you experience a personal emergency that keeps you from meeting a deadline, obtain permission from the professor for an extension of the due date. 

 

Athletes participating in sports events that require them to miss a class must notify me at least one day in advance and must make arrangements in order to make up any in-class work.  You must get class notes from fellow students.  

 

Organization

You must maintain a ½” binder portfolio for all written assignments.  When handing in a revision of a written assignment, the previous draft or drafts (with peer and/or professor comments) must also be included.  **You must follow the all the steps for completing essays in the correct order and hand all drafts and final copies in on time to receive full credit for essays.  **

 

Workshops/Conferences

On peer review workshop days, you will be required to bring five copies of your essay with you to hand out to the other members of your workshop group.  If you do not have these copies, you will not receive full credit for the essay.  If you are not present on the day of the workshop, you will not receive full credit for the essay. You will be assessed on written comments that you supply to the other students in your workshop group.

 

During your scheduled student/professor conference, you are expected to be prompt and to bring a revised copy of your essay with you.  You will not receive full credit for your essay if you miss your appointed conference time.    

 

Academic dishonesty is serious.

Any academic dishonesty, including plagiarism, carries a penalty and will result in a 0 for the particular assignment, possible failure in the course and possible suspension from the university.  All documented essays must follow proper MLA guidelines for citations in order to properly credit both textbook and outside sources.  Refer to your student handbook and your Hacker writing reference for specific details regarding this serious subject so you can guard yourself against such an offense. 

 

There are no short cuts.

The only real way to get through the reading and writing assignments is to just do them.  I advise you not to rely on sources that provide summaries of readings.  They are not always accurate and do not provide adequate assistance in understanding of the texts.  We will discuss each reading assignment, so read the texts and ask questions in class. 

 

Paper presentation

All essays (with the exception of handwritten in-class essays) must be typed in 12-point font, regular Times New Roman or Arial.  All writing must follow MLA guidelines – see pages 48 and 404 of the Hacker handbook for more specific details.   Some of you may need to reset your software’s default margins from 1.25” to 1”. 

 

Being respectful

No electronic devices will be tolerated.  Phones are to be shut off, not silenced, and put away.  (In case of a Rave alert, I will keep my phone out and set to vibrate).  Any student using an electronic device during class will be asked to leave, will lose class participation points for that day and will not be allowed to make up any in-class work.  

A habit of arriving late will not be tolerated; it is disruptive to the professor as well as to the students who have arrived to class on time.  If you are unavoidably late, please be considerate to the rest of us and enter quietly.  

 

Extra help

My office hours are listed at the top of the front page of the syllabus.  I encourage each student to seek my help during these hours if needed.  I may also be reached through email. 

 

I also highly encourage each student to visit the Academic Support Center located on the first floor of Knutti in room 114.  You will find writing tutors as well as tutors in other subjects who can help guide you to a successful transition into college life and who can assist you throughout your college career.  Visit the Academic Support Center website for more information. 

 

Extra opportunities

I will offer two types of extra credit opportunities during the semester.  If you can demonstrate a connection between one or more of the texts that we have read and a news event that has occurred within one week and that you have accessed from a reputable newspaper or news magazine (The Washington Post or Newsweek, for instance), you may write a 2-3 paragraph essay showing the significance of the connection.  You will not receive extra credit points if you simply summarize the article.  You must include the article or a copy of the article with your essay.  There will be a maximum of 3 extra credit essays accepted per student, and I will accept only one extra credit essay within one week from any one student.

 

In addition to the extra credit mentioned above, I will offer one additional opportunity.  I am one of the directors of The Rude Mechanicals production of William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, which will be performed in November.  You may attend the play at Reynolds’ Hall and then write a 2-3 paragraph essay describing significant connections between the play and one or more of the texts we’ve read.  If you write a summary of the play itself, you will not receive extra credit points.   

 

Extra credit opportunities are worth a maximum of 3 points each – that means if you do them all, and do them all well, you may receive an additional 12 points total.  Extra credit points will be totaled at the end of the semester, and all points will be applied to your one lowest essay grade only.  Extra credit points cannot be applied to your class participation grade. 

 

Syllabus for English 101

Calendar subject to change.  Notice of changes will be given as required. 

 

CLASS WORK REQUIREMENTS:

 

  • Three in-class essays
  • Three out of class, documented essays
  • Class participation
  • Reading of assignments
  • Other writing, reading exercises as assigned

 

READING ASSIGNMENTS FOR THIS CLASS:

 

  1. Frederick Douglass, Learning to Read (pp. 506-512) 
  2. Martin Luther King, Jr., Letter from Birmingham City Jail (pp. 172-189) 
  3. Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis 
  4. Aung San Suu Kyi, from In Quest of Democracy (pp. 190-197)
  5. Simone de Beauvoir, from The Ethics of Ambiguity (pp. 68-76)
  6. Mencius from the Mencius (pp. 16-23)
  7. Hsun Tzu, Man’s Nature is Evil (pp. 24-28)  
  8. Niccoló Machiavelli, from The Prince (pp. 130-138) 
  9. Christine de Pizan, from The Treasure of the City of the Ladies (pp. 122-129)
  10. Chinua Achebe, Language and the Destiny of Man  (pp. 592-600)
  11. Plato, Allegory of the Cave  (pp. 447-454)
  12. Cosmological Chart of the Ptolemaic Universe (pp. 381-383)

 

GRADING:

Grades for this class are calculated on a 10-point scale.  Refer to the front of the Hacker handbook for grading rubric.

Essay 1 – 10%

Essay 2 – 10%

Essay 3 – 15%

Essay 4 – 15%

Essay 5 – 20%

Essay 6 – 20% (final exam)

Class participation – 10% of final grade

Extra credit – possible 3% each, with the total applied to lowest essay grade

 

Key to understanding the syllabus:

 

  • Discuss = discussion that will take place that day during class – come prepared (if a reading was assigned, have it completed) and bring necessary texts
  • Write in class = writing that will take place that day during class
  • Read, Write = work to be prepared for the next class period

 

Monday, 8/18 

Discuss: Introduction, Syllabus

Read: Austin, “Prereading,” “Annotating,” and “Identifying Patterns” (pp. 635-644)

                                      

Wednesday, 8/20

Discuss: Austin, Hacker (pp. 93-95 – sentence style, 99-105 – modifiers, 107-108 – verbs, 112-114 – clauses, 117 – sentence variety, grammatical sentences, 187-215 – pronouns , 24-26 – writing paragraphs, 31-37 – writing paragraphs) (p. 48 – proper MLA page set up), intro to Douglass, annotating example

Read: Frederick Douglass, Learning to Read (p. 506-512)

           

Friday, 8/22 – Last Day to Add/Drop or Late Register via RAIL or at Ikenberry Hall 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Discuss: Frederick Douglass, Hacker

Write in class: 1-2 paragraph essay.

 

Monday, 8/25

Discuss: **Note Change – “Eyes on the Prize” video

Read: webpage, Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from Birmingham City Jail (pp. 172-189) AND Austin, “Summarizing,” (pp. 647-648)

 

** Persepolis is playing Monday, 8/25 and Tuesday, 8/26 at 7:00 pm in the Storer Ballroom

 

Wednesday, 8/27

Discuss: Letter from Birmingham City Jail, “Summarizing,” MLK, Jr. summary example

Write: 1-2 paragraph summary of Frederick Douglass

 

Friday, 8/29 – Last Day to Change a Course from Credit to Pass/Fail Status.

Discuss: Hacker, (p. 57-63 – reading, writing, 14-18 – drafting), (p. 259-273 – comma review), Intro to Persepolis, Intro to Marx

Read: webpage, click here to find Iran, Persepolis (pp. 1-46) AND Austin, “Reading with a Critical Eye,” (pp. 648-651)

Segregation webpage – www.remembersegregation.org

Purpose of an essay

Organization of an essay

**Persepolis is playing Friday, 8/29 at 7:00 pm at Reynolds Hall

 

Monday, 9/1 – NO CLASS – LABOR DAY

 

Wednesday, 9/3

Discuss: Persepolis, Hacker, revision tactics (p. 18-23)

Write: revision of summary of Frederick Douglass

Read: Persepolis (pp. 47-71)

 

Friday, 9/5

Discuss: Persepolis, Austin, Supporting Ideas (pp. 680-698)

Read: Persepolis (pp. 72-102)

 

Monday, 9/8

Discuss: Persepolis, Hacker/Austin  

Read:  Persepolis  (pp. 103-125) AND Austin, Structuring Ideas “Thesis Statements” (pp. 664-669)

 

Wednesday, 9/10

Discuss: Writing a thesis: Structuring Ideas, Hacker, (p. 10, 66, 69-90)  supporting a thesis, evaluating arguments)

Read: Persepolis (pp. 126-153)

 

Friday, 9/12

Discuss: final discussion of Persepolis

Write: 2 paragraph summary of Persepolis

 

Monday 9/15

Discuss: Austin, “Introductions,”  “Transitions,” and “Conclusions” (pp. 669-679); Austin, Synthesizing Ideas: “Summarizing Multiple Sources” and Comparing and Contrasting” (pp. 699-703), Intro to Aung San Suu Kyi

Read: Aung San Suu Kyi, from In Quest of Democracy

Find: Burma on a map

 

Wednesday, 9/17

Discuss: Aung San Suu Kyi

Write: revision summary of Persepolis 

 

Friday, 9/19

Discuss: Austin, “Synthesizing Ideas to Form your own Argument” (pp. 707-712), Austin, Generating Ideas (pp. 652-663), “Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing” (pp. 718-725), Sample documented essay (pp. 730-734).

 

 Monday, 9/22

Discuss: Review of Hacker & Austin, Essay #1 assignment

 

Wednesday, 9/24

Write in class: first draft Essay #1 (in-class, examples)

 

Friday, 9/26

Write in class: revised draft Essay #1

Read:  Simone de Beauvoir

Appalachian Heritage Writer-in-Residence Adriana Trigiani is in on campus next week.  Check out the Appalachian Heritage website for details.

 

Monday, 9/29

Discuss: Simone de Beauvoir

Write in class: final revised draft of Essay #1 (if needed)

 

Wednesday, 10/1

 Discuss: writing/reading review, Essay #2 assignment (out of class, documented)

Write: first draft of Essay #2

 

Friday, 10/3

Discuss: Writing/reading review, Essay #2 problems/questions

Sign Up: for student/professor conference – makes sure time does not conflict with a mid-term for another class

Write: revised draft of Essay #2

Confirm: Click here to confirm conference time

 

Monday, 10/6-Friday, 10/10  -- Mid-term week

 

We will not meet as a class this week.

Monday, 10/6 – CONFERENCES

**DUE: before 8:00 a.m. -- revised draft of Essay #2 emailed to me as an attachment.

Meet: At scheduled conference time – bring draft of Essay #2

Write: revised draft of Essay #2 

 

Tuesday, 10/7 – CONFERENCES

Meet: At scheduled conference time – bring draft of Essay #2

Write: revised draft of Essay #2 

 

Wednesday, 10/8 – CONFERENCES

Meet: At scheduled conference time – bring draft of Essay #2

Write: revised draft of Essay #2 

 

Thursday, 10/9 – CONFERENCES

Meet: At scheduled conference time – bring draft of Essay #2

Write: revised draft of Essay #2 

 

Monday, 10/13

DUE: Final draft of Essay #2

Discuss: Intro to Mencius

Read:  Mencius

 

Wednesday, 10/15 – mid-term grades available on RAIL (tentative)

Discuss: Mencius, Intro to Hsun Tzu

Read: Hsun Tzu, Man’s Nature is Evil (pp. 24-28)

 

Friday, 10/17

Discuss: Hsun Tzu, Essay #3 assignment (in-class)

 

Monday, 10/20

Write in class: first draft Essay #3

 

Wednesday, 10/22

Workshop: Peer response – Essay #3

 

Friday, 10/24

Write in class: final draft of Essay #3 – you may bring a rough copy with you

Read: Machiavelli, from The Prince (pp. 130-138)

 

Monday, 10/27

Discuss: The Prince

Write:  250 word summary of either Hsun Tzu or The Prince

 

Wednesday, 10/29

Discuss: Intro to Christine de Pizan

Read: Christine de Pizan

 

Friday, 10/31

Discuss: Christine de Pizan

Write: revision of Hsun Tzu or The Prince

 

Monday, 11/3

Discuss: Intro to Achebe, Essay #4 assignment (out of class, documented)

Read: Achebe

 

Wednesday, 11/5

Discuss: Achebe

Write: first draft of Essay #4

 

Friday, 11/7 – Last Day to Withdraw from a Full Semester Class, see Advisor by Noon.

Workshop: Peer response – Essay #4

Sign up: for student/professor conference – make sure time does not conflict with another class

Write: revised draft of Essay #4

 

CONFERENCES – We will not meet as a class this week.

Monday, 11/10-- CONFERENCES

**DUE: before 8:00 a.m. -- revised draft of Essay #4 emailed to me as an attachment.

Meet: at scheduled conference time – bring revised draft of Essay #4

Write: final revised draft of Essay #4

 

Tuesday, 11/11 – CONFERENCES

Meet: at scheduled conference time – bring revised draft of Essay #4

Write: final revised draft of Essay #4

 

Wednesday, 11/12 – CONFERENCES first day of academic advisement for continuing students for spring 2009

Meet: at scheduled conference time – bring revised draft of Essay #4

Write: final revised draft of Essay #4

 

Thursday, 11/12 – CONFERENCES

Meet: at scheduled conference time – bring revised draft of Essay #4

Write: final revised draft of Essay #4

 

Monday, 11/17

DUE: final draft of Essay #4

Discuss: Intro to Plato, Allegory of the Cave

Read: webpage, Plato, Allegory of the Cave, Ptolemaic Universe

 

Wednesday, 11/19

Discuss: Plato, Ptolemaic Universe, Essay #5 assignment (out of class, documented)

Write: first draft of Essay #5

 

Friday, 11/21

Workshop: Peer response – Essay #5

Write: revised draft of Essay #5

 

11/23-11/30 – Thanksgiving Recess – No Classes

 

Monday, 12/1

Workshop: Peer/Professor response – Essay #5

Write: final draft of Essay #5

 

Wednesday, 12/3

DUE: final revised draft of Essay #5

Discuss: Review

 

Friday, 12/5 – last day of classes

Discuss: Review, Essay #6 (in class – final exam)

 

Monday, 12/8 – first day of final exams

 

Wednesday, 12/10

Final exam for 8:10 class – Essay #6

Bring your Austin and Hacker texts. 

 

Friday, 12/12

Final exam for 2:10 class – Essay #6

Bring your Austin and Hacker texts. 

 

Tuesday, 12/16 – final grades available on RAIL (tentative)